Spoken Word Discography

ZDA 134
Dead In Tune/George and the Dragonfly
narrated by Robin Ray/Susan Stranks/John Kershaw
May 70
Dead in Tune

Side 1
DEAD IN TUNE
Written and narrated by Robin Ray
Music by Herbert Chappell

Side 2
GEORGE AND THE DRAGONFLY
Written by John Kershaw
Music by Herbert Chappell
Narrated by Robin Ray, Susan Stranks and John Kershaw


The Leicestershire Schools Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Herbert Chappell
Produced by FREDERICK WOODS Recording Engineer KEVIN DALY


ZPR 122-3 (original release)
DPA 3041-2 (re-release)
The Wonder of the Age – Mr Edison’s New Talking Phonograph
Compiled and produced by Kevin Daly

The Wonder of the Age - Mr. Edison's New Talking Phonograph

The Wonder of the Age - Booklet

Read Kevin’s ‘The Wonder of the Age’ sleeve note »

Side 1
THE WONDER OF THE AGE
SAM MAYO: Put That Gramophone Record On Again
A little affair of metal
Mister Edison’s Workshop
The familiar voices of the dead

FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE
WILLIAM EWART GLADSTONE
LORD STANLEY
P.T. BARNUM
TRUMPETER KENNETH LANDFREY
Edison Phonograph adverstisement
The practical use of the Phonograph
The real music of the future

SIR ARTHUR SULLIVAN: I Am Amazed And Terrified…
BILLY GOLDEN: Turkey In The Straw
The first Gramophone record
SOUSA’S BAND: There’ll Be A Hot Time In The Old Town Tonight
Phonographic reporting
Phonograph versus Gramophone
Unlimited copies of one record
A visit to a disc factory

HOME GUARDS BAND: Lend Me Your Aid (from ‘La Reine de Saba’)
A great Phonograph enthusiast
Forgery of voices
The Greenhill clockwork motor
Cats!
An old minstrel man

BURT SHEPARD: Auction Sale Of A Piano
The stumbling block
Introduction to the studio

RUSSELL HUNTING: Troubles Of A German Street Band

Side 2
LET’S HAVE A SONG ON THE GRAMOPHONE
Catering to the lower types
MARIE LLOYD: A Little Of What You Fancy
A blush to the cheeks
Pirate tactics
George Mozart

GEORGE FORMBY: The difficulties of recording
HARRY CHAMPION: P.C. Green
The master records did not last
Neophone records

PREMIER CONCERT ORCHESTRA: Suppé: Light Cavalry – Overture
Advertisements 1903-1906
The stridency of its infancy
Pathé advertisement

ENRICO CARUSO: Tu Non Vuoi Piu Bene
1904 Court Case

INNOVATIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS
STANLEY KIRKBY: When The Gramophone Shop Caught Fire
The Telegraphone
Talking tapes, the records of the future

THOMAS ALVA EDISON: Speech to 1908 Electrical Exhibition
THE BUSKING BAND: The Busking Band Contest
Changing from zinc etching
The Multiplex Grand Graphophone
The double-sided disc
A defective machine
1905 Court Case
Instruments of torture

BILLY GOLDEN: Whistling Pete
Music fit for a scrap-heap!

THE CARRIAGE TRADE
The Gramophone and Typewriter Limited
FRANCESCO TAMAGNO: Verdi: ‘Il Trovatore': Di Quella Pira
Is a pound too much?
I now took Gramophones seriously

NELLIE MELBA: Nymphs et Sylvains
The ideal woman

Side 3
THE CARRIAGE TRADE (Part Two)
Letter from Sir J.G. Tollemache-Sinclair
ALBERT WHELAN: Sympathy
The Hampstead Board of Guardians
I read in the Daily Mail
Letter from Adelina Patti-Cederstr&#246m

ADELINA PATTI: Mozart: ‘Don Giovanni’ – Batti Batti, piano accompaniment by LANDON RONALD
One Hundred Disc Graphophones
The Copyright Protection Society
The Gramophone as an educational force

PABLO DE SARASTE: Saraste: Ziguenerweisen

THE GREAT WAR
HARRISON LATIMER: Your King And Country Need You
Keep the trade flag flying
Message from the Gramophone Company
Patriotism, not spite!
Message to Edison-Bell employees
The City of London Regiment
Regal war records

VIOLET LORRAINE: Three Cheers For Little Belgium
Belgian refugees
Records for the fleet!

HORATIO BOTTOMLEY: Albert Hall Speech, 1915
The greatest patriotic catalogue of all!
HARRY FAY: Somebody’s Boy Is Out At the Front
GAS SHELL BOMBARDMENT: By the Royal Garrison Artillery, prior to entering Lille, 9 October 1918
The Publisher’s Association
A Decca Romance

PETER DAWSON: The Tanks That Broke The Ranks
Letter from F.K. Cox
THE GRAND PEACE RECORD: Intro: Arrival of the troops in London; When Tommie Comes Marching Home; Home Sweet Home; The British Grenadiers; Rule Britannia
ERNESTINE SCHUMANN-HEINK: Speech
Company report, November 1918

Side 4
DANCE CRAZY
Who doesn’t know how to dance?
ORIGINAL DIXIELAND JASS BAND: Dixie Jass Band One Step
Jazz dancing – an influence for evil!
A texture of quaint effects

MAYFIELD DANCE ORCHESTRA: I’m Gonna Bring A Water Melon
The power of the needle

DO IT YOURSELF
The Duophone
CARNIVAL DANCE BAND: Eddie Steady
Horns
The velvet polishing pad
Portables
The deaf
Needles
Electric drive
The Photophone
Married to a Gramophile (‘Scrutatress’)
The new instruments
Even the most cynical (Compton Mackenzie)
Epigramophones (Hilaire Belloc)

GEORGE BERNARD SHAW: Extract from ‘Spoken English and Broken English’

CERTAIN PATENTS
Wireless broadcasting
Our Lizzie gets a Gramophone

ANDERSON TYRER: piano, with THE BRITISH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, conducted by DR. ADRIAN BOULT: Liszt: Piano Concerto No.1 in E flat (3rd movement)
Things hitherto unbelievable
JOHN BARBIROLLI AND HIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: Wagner: The Flying Dutchman – Overture
Making Gramophone history
Certain patents
The Brunswick Light Ray method

AUBREY BRAIN with the ROYAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: Mozart: Horn Concerto No.2, K.417
A remarkably stereoscopic effect (Compton Mackenzie)
Letters for and against
The uses and resources of a gramophone (Fay Compton)
A Riddle (1898)

Narrated by Gary Watson Richard Bebb Peter Orr Frank Duncan Freda Dowie
Compiled & produced by KEVIN DALY


ZPR 111-2
History Reflected VI – World Wars 1914 1939
September 1971
History Reflected VI - World Wars 1914 1939

Side 1
WORLD WAR ONE 1914-1918
Prologue
Home before the leaves fall?
August 4, 1914 – Britain declares War on Germany
What did you do in the Great War, Daddy?

Side 2
The Pity of War
The War in the Air
Nurse Cavell
Gallipoli
The Closing Phase

Side 3
WORLD WAR TWO 1939-1945
The Long Weekend 1918-1939
The Gathering Storm
A State of War
The Home Front

Side 4
The Blitz
Arma Virumque Cano
Europe in Chains
Keep right on to the end of the road
Epilogue

THE APOLLO SOCIETY presents HISTORY REFLECTED – A series of programmes reflecting six periods of English History – Volume VI: World Wars Artistic Adviser, George Rylands Devised by, Peter Orr

With Frank Duncan Duncan McIntyre Richard Pasco Prunella Scales Ian Holm Virginia McKenna Michael Redgrave Donald Sinden David King Peter Orr George Rylands Dorothy Tutin Gary Watson

David King, piano Ciobhan O’Dalaigh (Kevin Daly!), singer with ukulele Geoffrey Shaw, baritone Musical Adviser, Michael Bremner

Recorded by KEVIN DALY Edited and directed by PETER ORR


ZDA 166
Speaking Personally P.G. Wodehouse (October 1974)


ZSW 535-6
Let’s All Go To The Music Hall
Compiled and produced by Kevin Daly
narrated by Stanley Holloway, Ted Ray, Jessie Matthews, Sandy Powell
August 1975

Let's All Go To The<br />
Music Hall - Front Cover

Side 1
FREE AND EASIES AND PENNY GAFFS
HARRY CLAFF: Let’s All Go To The Music Hall
A free and easy
The thing that did most take me

TREVOR CROZIER: Sam Hall
Methinks it had been
Some places have orchestras
The Chairman

ROBB CURRIE: Beer, Glorious Beer
The Canterbury Arms
One’s repertoire must be repeated
Penny Gaffs

HARRY FAY & COMPANY: Jolly Company

FINE NEW BUILDINGS
Every publican
The Oxford Music Hall

ALFRED LESTER & BUENA BENT: The Village Fire Brigade
Leotard at the Alhambra
A manager once engaged me

PRIMO SCALA’S ACCORDION BAND: The Man On The Flying Trapeze
Signor Plimmeri
East of Temple Bar
One house in the Midlands
Another of the show places
The old ‘Gaiety’ in Liverpool
A woman was rarely seen
The prices of admission

SANDRA KERR: The Boy In The Gallery
There is a school of critics
BOBBIE COMBER & COMPANY: Champagne Charlie/I Can’t Tell Why I Love You But I Do
My parents, reverent Christian folk
THE VICTOR CHORUS: Paddle Your Own Canoe

Side 2
IF THE MANAGERS ONLY THOUGHT THE SAME AS MOTHER
GERTIE GITANA: Nellie Dean
An outdoor Gala
ALBERT CHEVALIER: ‘EE Can’t Take A Roise Out Of Oi
As the halls multiplied
MAIDIE SCOTT: If The Managers Only Thought The Same As Mother
I am not a particularly nervous person
GEORGE JACKLEY & LESLIE SARONY with JACK HYLTON & HIS BAND: Excelsior
If not stunned by a bottle
BILLY MERSON: The Night I Appeared As Macbeth
The bright idea
Most of the Agent’s offices

PALACE OF VARIETIES
PALACE OF VARIETIES’ MARCH
THE PICCADILLY ORCHESTRA: Cinderella Music
The one-legged pedestal clog dancer
THE LONDON ORCHESTRA: Lancashire Clogs
The boy wonder of the high wire
BOBBIE COMBER & COMPANY: In The Good Old Summer-time
DOMENICO POSETTI ORCHESTRA: The Entry Of The Gladiators
The most terrifying act on earth
DAWSON’S MUSICAL CANARIES: Liebestraume
Miss Aqua-Vitae
MARIE KENDALL: A Bird In A Gilded Cage
The unparalleled necromancer
Beverages sold at this theatre

ZAMPA: Overture
HARRY CHAMPION: I Enjoyed It
FLORRIE FORDE: Kelly From The Isle Of Man

Side 3
RULE BRITANNIA!
CRESWELL COLLIERY BAND: Rule Britannia
On a certain occasion at Windsor
RAYMOND NEWELL: The Boys Of The Old Brigade
Look at poor Tommy Atkins
GEORGE BASTOW: Captain Ginjah O.T.
BARREL ORGAN: Oh! Dear, What Can The Matter Be/The Blue Danube
Statements to Salvation Army Officer, 13 June 1890
GUS ELEN: Wait ’til The Work Comes Round
BARREL ORGAN: Can-Can
Statements to Salvation Army Officer, 13 June 1890
ELLA SHIELDS: Burlington Bertie From Bow
MAURICE FARKOA: I Love You In Velvet
The public demands good figures
ALICE LLOYD: The Nearer The Bone, The Sweeter The Meat
A rendezvous for the fast set
ROSIE LLOYD: When I Take My Morning Promenade
When you see a girl on the streets
GEORGE FORMBY: Toodle-I-Oodle-I-Oo

ON TOUR
Drury Lane Pantomime
WILKIE BARD: The Cleaner
Nothing can subdue Dan Leno
DAN LENO: Mrs Kelly
Dan Leno’s memorial
THE RIDGEWAY PARADE: Watching The Trains Come In
It was about 1900
As the train pulled into the theatre
Theatrical digs
Mrs Boscombe

GEORGE LASHWOOD: Riding On Top Of The Car

Side 4
WHAT ABOUT THE WORKERS?
To earn his big fees
GEORGE FORMBY: Twice Nightly
You were informed in your contract
Agreed penalties
Notices in Moss Empires dressing rooms

GEORGE FORMBY: Twice Nightly
Matinees!
In the keen competition
Letters to and from Mr. Oswald Stoll
The long standing trouble
At the Islington Empire
Picket notice

CHARLES COBURN: It’s So Simple
Crying in the wilderness of indifference
I could see plainly enough

BY ROYAL COMMAND
MARIE LLOYD: Every Little Movement Has A Meaning Of Its Own
1st July 1912: Royal Command Performance. Commentary from ‘The Era’
G.H. CHIRGWIN: The Jocular Joker
LITTLE TICH: One Of The Deathless Army
GEORGE ROBEY: It’s The First Time I’ve Ever Seen That
HARRY LAUDER: Roamin’ In The Gloamin’
VESTA TILLEY: Jolly Good Luck To The Girl Who Loves A Soldier
CLARICE MAYNE: Give Me A Cosy Little Corner/Put On Your Ta-Ta Little Girlie
HARRY CLAFF: Let’s All Go To The Music Hall
ROB CURRIE: Auld Lang Syne

Musical interpolations created by Maestro Hazell, B.Mus., ARCM., ARCO.,
Mr. Edison’s phonograph operated by Mr. Iain Churches, Gent.,
The famous graphic scenas and decorations of Mr. Robin Mukerji
THE ENTIRE PRODUCTION UNDER THE PERSONAL SUPERVISION OF MR. KEVIN DALY


ZSW 537-9
The Complete Stories from Winnie The Pooh
read by Norman Shelley
November 1975
The Complete Stories from Winnie The Pooh

Side 1
CHAPTER ONE
In which we are introduced to Winnie-the-Pooh and some bees, and the stories begin

CHAPTER TWO
In which Pooh goes visiting and gets into a tight place

Side 2
CHAPTER THREE
In which Pooh and Piglet go hunting and nearly catch a Woozle

CHAPTER FOUR
In which Eeyore loses a tail and Pooh finds one

CHAPTER FIVE (part one)
In which Piglet meets a Heffalump

Side 3
CHAPTER FIVE (part two)
In which Piglet meets a Heffalump, continued…

CHAPTER SIX
In which Eeyore has a birthday and gets two presents

Side 4
CHAPTER SEVEN
In which Kanga and baby Roo come to the Forest, and Piglet has a bath

Side 5
CHAPTER EIGHT
In which Christopher Robin leads an expotition to the North Pole

CHAPTER NINE (part one)
In which Piglet is entirely surrounded by water

Side 6
CHAPTER NINE (part two)
In which Piglet is entirely surrounded by water, continued

CHAPTER TEN
In which Christopher Robin gives a Pooh party, and we say good-bye

Recorded at Argo Studios, Fulham Road Recorded by KEVIN DALY Directed by HARLEY USILL


ZSW 561-3
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
read by Bing Crosby
April 1976
'Tom Sawyer' read by Bing Crosby

3-LP Box set

Music by David and Tommy Reilly Tommy Reilly: Harmonica David Reilly: Guitar Billy Bell: Banjo Chris Hazell: Harmonium Sound effects by Geoff Milne and Peter Handford
Produced and Recorded by KEVIN DALY at Argo Studios, London


KEVIN’S SLEEVE NOTES ON THE MUSIC

The music used for this production of Tom Sawyer has been specially written to evoke both the mood and spirit of the period. The harmonica is the ideal instrument to capture this feeling, and historically was played in the United States from the 1840s. The idea for the instrument originated in China, and the first practical harmonica was made in Germany in 1823. It soon found its way across the Atlantic, brought by German immigrants, and as the ubiquitous mouth-organ was to be found everywhere. Easy to play, portable and cheap it was the ideal musical instrument for a pioneering land. Everybody played on; even Abraham Lincoln took a mouth-organ with him on his travels.

Ironically, in Europe the harmonica had become an instrument used only by the rich. European harmonicas were made of gold or silver and decorated with hand-carved ivory, and it was not until the 1890s that the instrument began to be made in a cheaper form and gain general popularity. Since then, the instrument has gained world-wide popularity and has been accepted as a very serious musical instrument. In 1967, reverting in a way to the earliest traditions, the first Hohner silver harmonica was built in London for Tommy Reilly. This superb instrument is heard on this recording.

Tommy Reilly is generally recognised as the world’s greatest exponent and authority of the harmonica. Born in a musical family in Guelph, Ontario, he studied violin and harmonica before coming to Europe before the Second World War. After a long spell as a prisoner of war, his career really started in 1946 with radio broadcasts, concerts and many overseas tours. In recent years he has given highly acclaimed performances with many of the world’s leading symphony orchestras, including the London Symphony Orchestra, the Oslo Symphony Orchestra and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

The music heard on this recording was written by Tommy’s son, David Reilly, and who could better understand the nuances of which the harmonica is capable, than the son of a great virtuoso. David was born in Bristol and studied politics at the University of Wales in Swansea, taking a Bachelor of Arts degree. After leaving university, he decided to make a career in music. He is entirely self-taught, yet in the relatively short time that he has been writing professionally he has built a solid reputation as a composer, arranger and performer. Tommy and David Reilly do not work together as often as they would like. While one is in Oslo the other might be in New York, so it is a great pleasure to hear thir combined talents adding so much to Bing Crosby’s splendid reading of this classic story.

© 1976 KEVIN DALY


ZSW 564
Doctor Who And The Pescatons
read by Tom Baker
June 1976
Doctor Who and the Pescatons


Comments

  1. Shirlee Hendrickson says

    How can I order a copy of “Dead In Tune” narrator Robin Ray, music by Herbert Chappell? Thank you. Shirlee

  2. Gerald Glover says

    What a wonderful site – I’m ashamed I’ve only just found it.
    (I co-founded the British Music Hall Society in Sep 1963 with the late Ray Mackender – we’re 50 years old in 2013.)

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